Talk at DesignOps Global Conference 2019 , Manchester, England, 30-31st May 2019

Topic: [TBD – On  DesOps /DesignOps ]
Date: 30/31 May 2019
Venue:  Manchester, England

Super excited to be part of DesignOps Global Conference (www.designops-conference.com) to share ideas with some great minds on hashtagdesignops hashtagdesops hashtagdesign and the future of hashtagdesign from the lens of hashtagopenorg culture and hashtagdesignthinking being applied as the way of life to improve and optimize the operations in the organizations to deliver the “wow” experience, through best utilizing the hashtagprocess and hashtagecosystems and hashtagtechnology in context. Thanks, Peter Fossick. Looking forward to a series of engaging sessions for every hashtagdesigner / hashtagleader.

 

About the Conference:

The DesignOps Global Conference is for design leaders, developers, practitioners, product managers, service innovators and business leaders that are defining the way we design and develop new products and services. Join us Manchester for the DesignOps Global Conference 2019 Agile and Beyond – New Frontiers in Design
30 + 31 May, 2019

The themes for this year’s DesignOps Global Conference are:

  • DAY 1
    • Theme 1: DesignOps and the impact of design
    • Theme 2: Collaborating at speed and scale
  • DAY 2
    • Theme 3: Developing new cultures – developing new organisations
    • Theme 4: DesignOps in the era of AI and cognitive computing

More details of the event and to get the pass visit https://designops-conference.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semantic Design System (Part -3): The Open Design System Ontology

[NOTE: Check the part 1 at : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/photo-essay-semantic-design-system-part-1-gaps-todays-samir-dash/ and part 2 at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/photo-essay-semantic-design-system-part-2-nuclear-model-samir-dash/]

This originally part of a talk I gave at UX-India Pre-Conference Meetup at Symbiosis College, Bengaluru on 1st September 2018, titled: Semantic Design System — Redefining Design Systems for DesOps . The talk explored the existing implementations of design-systems and will be making an attempt to provide high-level approach to define design systems for the next-gen enterprises.

“Design System” plays a critical role in bringing a common language and consistency in experience across different products and brands of the organisation, along with fuelling a collaborative approach towards design, making it easier for different team members to contribute.

(Continued to next post. )

#nucleardesign #design #desops #designops #designsystem #opendesignsystem #odso

(c) Samir Dash, 2018. All rights reserved. This content including the images are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license

Download the Paper – “In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps World”

It was a great pleasure to be at UGC seminar in Department of English B.B.Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Chandikhole on the topic ” In search of truth: At the crossroad of critical theory and technology in DesOps world” It was a very engaging session presided by principal Dr. Kedarnath Das, HOD English, Prof. Rajendra Padhi, Senior lecturers Jachindra Rout, Bimal Ch. Mallick, Dilagovinda Pratap, Nabajyoti Biswal. Dr. B.K.Nayak and the students from the department of English, Maths and Science.

Resource person Prof. Samir Dash, Bangalore. Sanjeev Behera, Psychologist, Presided by principal Dr. Kedarnath Das, HOD English, Prof. Rajendra Padhi, Senior lecturers Jachindra Rout, Bimal Ch. Mallick, Dilagovinda Pratap, Nabajyoti Biswal. Dr. B.K.Nayak.Image may contain: one or more people and text

 

Topic: In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps world
Date: 16 July 2018
Venue: Department of English, Baba Bhairabananda Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha (http://bbmchandikhole.org/)

 

Read it here: 
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/search-truth-crossroad-critical-theory-technology-desops-samir-dash/

Downloadable Paper/Slide: 

https://www.slideshare.net/MobileWish/in-search-of-truth-at-the-crossroad-of-critical-theory-and-technology-in-desops-world-16-july-2018-bbautonomus-college-chandikhol

 

Abstract:
This UGC seminar session was an attempt to understand, from a non-traditional lens, the relevance of critical theory in context to today’s ever-changing technology space that is moving towards the Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Distributed Computing, become much more important in history than ever, as it deals with softer aspects of human identity and socio-cultural dimension through communication or human expression.

This interactive session will have two major focus:

1. A brief overview of the critical theories from a diachronic lens that will be helping the students in grasping the fundamentals in a socio-cultural context.

2. A cross-discipline comparison with the modern design-driven practices in the software industry that would help the students understand the potential and opportunities in the real world scenario where these theories would help.

#DesOps #DevOps #design #designthinking #communication #criticaltheory #literature #englishliterature #englishlanguage

     

 

 

What the Failure of Google Glass Teaches About UX?

(This article was originally published on February 9, 2015 at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/what-failure-google-glass-teaches-ux-samir-dash/ )

In mid of January I saw the headlines making official announcement of the death of Google Glass. I was not surprised. I knew lot of issues ave to be addressed before Gass could make it to the expectations. Many of them are issues related to UX. All of them related to an grey area of UX space, which was never given the prime consideration when designing a seminal product like Glass and many other legends.
Back in 2013, I had wrote a few posts on the usability in context to the social aspect of Google Glass that was being ignored. When I read now the article saying “privacy concerns” is one of many reasons of failure, it certainly louds the many of the design approach concerns I had raised.

Google Glass is not evil product, everyone agrees. Even all agree that it has immense potential. However, it certainly needs a facelift from product design point of view — and there by from UX point of view.

We saw, the raise and fall of Google Glass carrying it’s pattern where we can notice how with the emergence of Google Glass, the topics related to devices infringing with personal privacy became hot cakes for tech-debates. Many social scientists, human rights activists had started to see the ‘Glass’ as the evil that reminds them with George Orwell’s ‘1984’. The fear of a ‘Google Big Brother’ controlling the major shares of the information world is seen as the intruder to private aspects of ‘the public’. The “Glass Hole” incarnation of the Glass is equally seminal as the product “Glass” it self, due to bring out the topics like “user privacy”, “social context” and certainly what I believe as the “Context of the Other”.

It is not the case that Google has not spent money on user research and usability aspects before going ahead with the concept of persons using glass that may change the way we interact with systems in our daily life. Usability wise, it is definitely a super gadget that has the potential to catapult the device industry into next century. But the new features and interaction methods implemented in the device in a manner that is actually a decade old approach that is only fit for human-computer-interaction (HCI) in case of smart phones and tablets which have less tendency to hurt sentiments of those who do not directly interact with the device when the user might be performing some actions in a certain socio-cultural context. These sentiments could result in the fear of losing privacy , cultural distrust and humiliation among the second-hand users of the device who are impacted indirectly in some way by the device actions in the context.

Historically, the product design process while following the check and balances with heuristics and usability models, has never given prime importance to the user’s relationship to the ‘Other’ in his environment. And this is the missing piece that needs to be re-discovered and fit into standard usability matrix when Google might give “Glass” a face-lift to bring it back with a new incarnation that is more friendly and less intruder to user’s privacy and is compatible with SX model (Socio-cultural Usability Model) which I had proposed earlier.

Socio-Cultural User Experience (SX) – the missing piece in UX


‘Socio-Cultural User Experience to represent the aspect of Usability Design or User Experience (UX) that deals with usability aspect of products/ software in a social context. This is the same “Context of Other”

Considering the ‘Others’ in the User’s Social circle:

The existing UX model does not analyze the need beyond the current user and his ‘type’ to do a usability test — it never considers how it is impacting the other members of the society while the target user set is using the app/system.
For example, using car horn is a safety measure, but using it near a hospital or school is considered as unsocial and disturbing. There are many social check points that bar users of any system from using it in special socio logical context.

Criteria of a Good ‘SX’ Compatible System

Criteria of a sound usability design of an app on socio-cultural context:

1. Universal—has design elements that are universal.
2. Ethical – follows principles and approach that has positive ethical value
3. Non-racial – non biased and non-provocative attitude to user’s race and beliefs.
Socio-cultural User Experience (SX) and Social Interaction Design (SxD)
4. Respectful – towards user’s culture, social beliefs and ethnicity
5. Safety – has it’s social impact that is safe for the User.
6. Non-abusive – must not exploit the user and the environment he is in .
7. Common Sense – has geared towards common sense – behaves and reacts to the user in a sensible way
8. Protect Privacy – App’s feature and interaction must protect user’s privacy and other humans in the social circle.

Let’s take the case of Google Glass.

Google Glass is designed in a way that can act as more personal than a mobile handset, as it is a spectacle and can be indispensable accessory for the user once he gets addicted to it by replacing his conventional glass with it.

But the support for camera to take picture can pose a problem for the user to enter private areas, industrial areas, secure zones and offices where cameras are not allowed. In some places of earth, the cultural restrictions are in practice to ban cameras in certain places — most of the temples in India do not allow cameras inside. Now imagine, if the user has replaced his traditional spectacle for it , then he may find it difficult to manage without it in these scenarios.
So by following SX approach in usability design, the glass will require to have a “detachable set of camera” used in the glass so that the user can detach the camera and which would power it off and at the same time allow the user to keep on using the glass as a conventional spectacle.
This example may be just one of many features that Google glass might have, but it is enough to illustrate the approach in thought.

Points to Focus on while designing a SxD Compatible System

1. Provide multiple alternatives to the interaction methods to control the same functionalities in different socio-cultural context.
2. User should have total control over enable/disable of interaction methods for different scenarios.
3. The default interaction method must follow ‘SX’ approach.
4. Provide options to the user to switch between interaction methods with the system as and when needed.
5. Alternative mechanisms should be provided for physically challenged users. Rethink on the use of gestures and other interaction methods in the Article 508 context as everyday the new devices with unpredictable (not necessarily negative!) interaction methods and features.

Gesture and other Interaction Medium of SxD:

The ‘Social Interaction Design’ approach has the following major facets in the system interaction towards the user in socio-usability context:

1. Facial Gestures—The selection of Human triggered facial gestures (e.g. wink, smile etc.) to activate the system or trigger any action in the system must be judged based on the canonical meaning of those gestures in social and cultural context of the user where he is going to use it. For example, in case of Google Glass , the feature of “winking” (the gesture developed by Google Glass developer Mike DiGiovanni http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57582500-93/google-glass-code-lets-you-snap-a-photo-with-a-wink/ ) at someone to take a photo can pose a problem if the user is in India or Middle East countries. Even in western world winking at a lady or group of ladies (even though it is unintentional for any kind of abasement) can be taken as a negative action (e.g. weakness in character) and evoke anger and misunderstanding. So even if the winking to take a feature is a ‘cool feature’, in social context SxD will suggest the usability/interaction engineer to rethink on it to implement some options to ‘keep it disabled by default and allow the user the total freedom to use his judgment to enable and use the feature in any given socio-cultural context. Fig5: The ‘wink’ gesture developed by Google Glass developer Mike DiGiovann allows user to take a snap of the surrounding with just a wink of an eye.

2. Sound Gestures — The selection of sound gestures – the use of voice or sound pattern to control the system should be examined for different user environments. For example blowing a whistle to activate a play functionality on a portable music player, or to open an SMS on the cell phone can be an interesting feature, but on the other hand if it becomes useless in a busy street or in a meeting room where a discussion is going on.

3. Touch-based Gestures – Touch, swipe and pinch are popular now a days as most of the tablets and smartphones offer this as a user friendly interaction method for the user. More devices are coming up which do not have any physical button rather a few multi-touch gestures are enough to fully control them. However ‘SxD’ stresses that the devices must be designed and developed with the interaction method that can allow alternative to the available touch triggered interaction mechanism. For example , while developing a digital medical instrument with touch sensitive display, the interaction methods should be carefully planned so that the surgeon can use the system without touching to avoid infections through contact with it while conducting any mission critical surgery.

4. Hand/Finger based 3D gestures – ‘SxD’ approach encourages to conduct a social analysis of the hand/finger based gestures that are planned to be used in a system – the gestures should selected / innovated by carefully studying the cultural context avoiding common gestures used in daily life that are considered abusive to others. In addition to this practical usage resulting out of user’s environment and work culture must be given consideration. For example the middle finger gesture commonly used by youths to represent the crack humiliating pun on the other should not be used for any app that is expected to be popular among the users from the similar demography. But note that only considering the demography is not enough to decide the gestures.

5. Mouse /Keyboard Control – Similar to the gesture, voice and the related interaction method with system, mouse, keyboard, joystick and other typical input device based methods should be considered with in the context in which they are going to be used. As this group of interaction method are very old, many standard guidelines are already in there in practice. They However we need to rethink on them and make sure they are upto date with the ever-changing human –computer-interaction domain.

Our world needs products that are not only usable but also safe to use socially. It is high time, we need to consider the “Other” in our social context to improve the products and thereby our future.

We Are Still Living in An In-accessible World

(This article was originally published on February 11, 2015 at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/we-still-living-in-accessible-world-samir-dash/ )

Last week while shopping in super market, noticed a person trying hard to recognize something on a propriety sauce food packet. Removing and again putting on the specs he tried for sometime, then asked for help “Hey buddy, can you help reading it for me if it is pure veg?”. “It’s a veg only.. just look at the green icon here” I replied while feeling a little surprise as the veterinarian icon was bigger than my thumb, and is relatively easier to notice even for people having visual challenges like Hyperopia (far sightedness). “Yes I too saw that, but it’s difficult to recognise if it green or red!”. I realized the person is a colour blind.

Back at home, I checked some of the food items I had purchased and was surprised to see in most cases the popular veg/non-veg icons (veg represented as a solid Green circle in a square and the non-veg in similar shapes but with red in color. Check it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetarian_mark ) is printed to food packets without any supportive text.

After running some basic color-blind tests on the same logo, to my surprise, it was clear to me why the person was having difficulty to read the symbol.
At different contrast level or slight changes in hues of red and green (which normally happens in different print or display conditions in daily usage), it is virtually impossible to detect both the symbols as two different symbols representing two polar opposite information — both of them looked almost the same!

If you notice it is not the only case where this kind of ambiguity is present.

In case of modern traffic light also we see the signal showing the same issues. Karl Peglau (1927–2009) criticised the fact that the standard colours of the traffic lights (red, yellow, green) did not provide for road users who were unable to differentiate between colours (10 percent of the total population); and that the lights themselves were too small and too weak when competing against luminous advertising and sunlight. (Read about it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampelm%C3%A4nnchen)

There are trivial areas also where you see majority of the designers totally forget the 10% of the public who will see their work of art. This reflects in flags to logos of brands. Even though it is not critical in such areas to handle color blindness in such cases, still if you make it easier for these users, it shows you care for them.

 

Peglau’s suggested model provided an improved version for the traffic light which was never used in .Later on many standardizations in traffic light improved the usability , however, there are a lot to improve in such areas.


While designing a product, specially with color, we need to pause and think about alternate approach to represent the information using form factors, symbols and /or effects to improve the accessibility and thereby evaluate before going ahead and implement it.

There are many cases we will find around us, that are inaccessible to persons with some kind of challenges, due to their design, approach of implementation. This gives us enough space to innovate and come up with better solutions to improve the usability and accessibility of these products and make our world a better place.