[Slides] In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps World B.B.Autonomus College, Chandikhol (2018)

 

This is a paper presented by Samir Dash at Department of English, Baba Bhairabananda Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha (http://bbmchandikhole.org/) on 16 July 2018

This UGC seminar session was an attempt to understand, from a non-traditional lens, the relevance of critical theory in context to today’s ever-changing technology space that is moving towards the Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Distributed Computing, become much more important in history than ever, as it deals with softer aspects of human identity and socio-cultural dimension through communication or human expression.

This interactive session will have two major focus:

1. A brief overview of the critical theories from a diachronic lens that will be helping the students in grasping the fundamentals in a socio-cultural context.

2. A cross-discipline comparison with the modern design-driven practices in the software industry that would help the students understand the potential and opportunities in the real world scenario where these theories would help.

#DesOps #DevOps #design #designthinking #communication #criticaltheory #literature #englishliterature #englishlanguage

Title: In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps world
Date: 16 July 2018
Venue: Department of English, Baba Bhairabananda Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha

More details can be found here:

Download the Paper – “In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps World”

Download the Paper – “In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps World”

It was a great pleasure to be at UGC seminar in Department of English B.B.Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Chandikhole on the topic ” In search of truth: At the crossroad of critical theory and technology in DesOps world” It was a very engaging session presided by principal Dr. Kedarnath Das, HOD English, Prof. Rajendra Padhi, Senior lecturers Jachindra Rout, Bimal Ch. Mallick, Dilagovinda Pratap, Nabajyoti Biswal. Dr. B.K.Nayak and the students from the department of English, Maths and Science.

Resource person Prof. Samir Dash, Bangalore. Sanjeev Behera, Psychologist, Presided by principal Dr. Kedarnath Das, HOD English, Prof. Rajendra Padhi, Senior lecturers Jachindra Rout, Bimal Ch. Mallick, Dilagovinda Pratap, Nabajyoti Biswal. Dr. B.K.Nayak.Image may contain: one or more people and text

 

Topic: In Search of Truth: At the Crossroad of Critical Theory and Technology in DesOps world
Date: 16 July 2018
Venue: Department of English, Baba Bhairabananda Autonomous Mahavidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha (http://bbmchandikhole.org/)

 

Read it here: 
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/search-truth-crossroad-critical-theory-technology-desops-samir-dash/

Downloadable Paper/Slide: 

https://www.slideshare.net/MobileWish/in-search-of-truth-at-the-crossroad-of-critical-theory-and-technology-in-desops-world-16-july-2018-bbautonomus-college-chandikhol

 

Abstract:
This UGC seminar session was an attempt to understand, from a non-traditional lens, the relevance of critical theory in context to today’s ever-changing technology space that is moving towards the Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Distributed Computing, become much more important in history than ever, as it deals with softer aspects of human identity and socio-cultural dimension through communication or human expression.

This interactive session will have two major focus:

1. A brief overview of the critical theories from a diachronic lens that will be helping the students in grasping the fundamentals in a socio-cultural context.

2. A cross-discipline comparison with the modern design-driven practices in the software industry that would help the students understand the potential and opportunities in the real world scenario where these theories would help.

#DesOps #DevOps #design #designthinking #communication #criticaltheory #literature #englishliterature #englishlanguage

     

 

 

[Slides] Ditto – Design Life Cycle Management Concept for DesOps (2016-17)

You can read a related article Translating Value at Different Stages of Design with Minimal Waste here:
http://desops.io/2018/05/12/translating-value-at-different-stages-of-design-with-minimal-waste/Also associated video here :
http://desops.io/2018/05/12/video-ditto-design-life-cycle-management-concept-for-desops-2016-17/

Infographic: The Left-Right Brain Analogy for Incident Tracking in DesOps

 

Download the PDF version here: https://www.slideshare.net/MobileWish/infographic-the-leftright-brain-analogy-for-incident-reporting-in-desops

©2018,”Infographic: The Left-Right Brain Analogy for Incident Reporting in DesOps” by Samir Dash.
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International License

Specstra 2.0 : My Experiments in Cloud Based Design Process Automation

(Originally posted on August 1, 2016 at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/specstra-20-my-experiments-cloud-based-design-process-samir-dash/ )

“Automation” is one of the trending phenomenon of the current technological world. Manufacturing industry has been pioneering it for decades. Other verticals are following it. In software development , testing and deployment field, automation is popularized by Dev OPS and Continuous Integration (CI) that helps speed up the software development life cycle (SDLC). But the SDLC is not only about the So what about the software design industry? What about the design phases of any SDLC? While design is getting more and more recognition across the entrepreneur world and many industry efforts like ‘IBM Design Thinking’ and similar frameworks and associated methodologies are trying to create a synergy between the ‘Agile’ approach of SDLC and the “Design Thinking”, it is an interesting crossroad in time, that can show ways of developing more usable and meticulously designed software and similar products. So when everyone is trying to bring automation to speed up process and speed up delivery, it is really interesting as well as challenging to come up solutions and tools that help in automation of designing phase of SDLC.

(Fig – It takes a minute or two for ‘Specstra’ to generate a print-ready 100 pages long style guide for any submitted design)

 

(Fig – The printable visual style guide generated within minutes from ‘Specstra’ comes handy for developers to make a pixel perfect UI)

In context of Software industry I always see “Design”  as an intersection between creativity and the technology where both shape each with the help from user needs and blending of these results into successful products. This also is the reason automating designing process is a lot more challenging than building solutions for automation of purely technology driven process. I accepted this challenge 2 years back during my short stint at an R&D center at Bangalore, of a leading mobile  brand, I was part of a large design team, where almost 70% of the crowd was visual designer and the rest belong to user experience and research team members. And many of these visual team who worked on different projects, complained about certain phases of the design process that involved creation of style guide of the app that they were working on. Every app project used to be developed for different flagship phones models with different resolutions as well as screen densities. And being developed in native languages for Android view-ports, designer used to develop each style guide for each project separately for each model of phone. Each style-guide has to be detailed to pixel level which the designer has to calculate and define taking calculation of the view port pixel density(PD). Many designers have to maintain different versions of the mock-up and the create specs for each version, which was more like a “drafts man’s job” with lesser creative moments for expressions and innovation than the previous phase where the designer has to follow the wire-frame and come up with pixel perfect mock-ups of the app screens.

Almost all the designers tried to grab their hands on the creative part of the job, getting engaged with the stake holders and
The senior designers prefered to avoid working on the style-guide, though they would love to review one. The not so seniors worked on the the drafting of the guide and churned out the specs document, yet do the crying that it is less creative even though it is one of the most critical part of the design process.

So I thought of calculating how much effort we are giving to a creative phase of creating a visual mock-up vs. a drafting work , i.e. creation of a specs document /style-guide. Roughly on average one view of a single screen to  be mocked up in something around 4-8 hours. creation of a very detailed spec. might need 4-6 hours of job. But if it is designed for multiple view-ports of an operating system with significant pixel density change along with varied resolutions, then this drafting time gets multiplied. So by creating 4 generations of phone models running different generation of Android might need 16- 24 hours. So the designer actually takes roughly one week of work for a view in this case from wire-framing stage to finished design with specs ready for the developer. Averagely an app can have 10 views , so the whole app would need approximately a month of work to be designed and be ready for 4 different models. Even though this is a very haigh level bare-bone calculation, it indicates a few things —

 

So in this context for a designer —
1. for the designer 1/4th of his work remains creative and gives him the scope to explore, innovate and express through his designs.
2. remaining 3/4th of his time is a purely drafts-man job.
So a designers job is actually boring as the volume of his output is not creative or inspirational.

For the organization —
1. It is paying higher fee for lower type of work. To exlain it — a creative work like that of coming of new designs is typically high paid job, where as the drafting job based on a creative guy’s is a low profile job , and should be paid less.
But interestingly this is the same designer, so the payment rate is actually based on his skill of how he performs in the 1/4th of the job where the creative juice flows and he is actually innovates.

2. Even though the 3/4th of the job is lower profile job, which could have been automated,consumes more from the delivery time. if we look at the timeline of the delivery of the design deliverables, we see that 1/4th of the delivery time is actually spent in creative way. So actually if there is a scope to automate the low profile manual work, where the designer does not need to use his right brain, then the deliverables could have been delivered in just 1 week instead of a month! Also note that time is money for industry, so the organization is actually spend 300% more than it should and that too on a higher price point.

Again apart from this there are other factor that contributed to a above problem. Being in a world of rapidly changing requirements, many industry are following “Agile” or “Iterative” approach of work. Which means in the short notice things can change even to the look and feel and UI aspect which would mean a change to the style guide if view of standard control lines are affected.This has a cascading effect that flows through the style guide work. So any change in such requirement means the wastage of effort and addition of new efforts to keep the specs aligned. Imagine, if multiple design centered projects are running on mission critical deadlines due to faster time to market needs, and such kind of scenario is happening to most of the projects. Looking at these kind of need, many design firms, keep a larger design workforce, to absorb such shocks. But that means more volume of cash burn at a higher price points for the enterprise and smaller startups do not stand a chance in such scenarios.

Another aspect that I think is important to notice here is that due to time crunch, many designers prefer to avoid granularity in the style guides. Provide common documentation and provide very high level change documentations to developers. Also in some cases there are gaps left in the document that go unnoticed, which forces the developers to get in touch with the designers during development phases. Also due to lack of a complete and meaningful style guide or specs, the software testing also gets impacted due to many blur lines among what is in and what’s out. Certain things the testers take as assumptions while completing the testing phases.

Specstra is a pet prototype that I had started working on, 3 years back (around 2013) to explore a possible solution for design related automation process.
The problem of design automation is most of the process blocks are related to creative aspect of the work the designer does. So I started with the blocks that were more aligned to less creative activity so that these blocks can be removed from the creative process flow . One of such area was creation of style guide design from the selected design where the designer has to spend hours to manually define specs.

 

SAMPLE STYLE GUIDE GENERATED FROM THE PROTOTYPE
https://samirshomepage.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/sample-generated-style-guide-output1418308769-en.pdf

 

The user can upload  Adobe Photoshop (  PSD), Adobe Illustrator (.AI), or PDF formatted exported from any design tool (Corel draw, Paint etc.) and within minutes Specstra can generate style guide which other wise would have taken the user days to complete and that with prone to error.

Typical Pain-points of manual approach of style-guide or a specs document creation are:

  1.  Tedious process
  2.  Lots of manual work 
    no creativity – draftsman-ship work is not fun for designer.
  3.  Time & effort consuming activity
  4.  Not scalable
    there is limit to how much a single designer can do
  5.  Comes with cost 
    Creative guys are paid to do these non-creative tings – however charges   remain the same.
  6.  Threat to agile projects 
    last moment changes in design can impact the software delivery

 

Specstra addressed all of these along with some additional benefits —

  1. Completely Cloud based
    N
    o software to install
  2. Not restricted to Adobe software solution
    Can support non adobe software
  3. Minimal user intervention is workflow
    Design automation is possible
  4. Quick to Delivery
    Reduces the designer time to delivery by 99% or more.
  5. Saves $$$$
    Saves money by 50% or more.
  6. Supports creativity
    Designer can save more time for creative stuffs and is saved from draftsman-ship.
  7. Multi-language support
    Helps a global team
  8. Supports Agile SDLC
    Quick iterations and design changes will not delay the time to development as style guide can be ready in a few minutes.
  9. One click User Experience
    One click GUI guide makes the workflow super easy.
  10. Automatically handles multiple device resolutions and screen densities.
  11. Scalable for any volume of works.
  12. No need to pay to reserve people for the work .

 

Overview of Features:

Multi Design file support:
Outputs from Photoshop, Illustrator, Corel Draw, In-Design, Gem  to be supported.

Super easy to use dashboard:
Dashboard that is easy to use and aligns with the design workflow.

Customized report builder:
Editor to add and remove details, renaming etc.

 

Detailed Report:
Font, Shape, Color, Grid, Absolute, Relative positioning. In every iteration the report  is complete in all respect.

5-10 minutes delivery  :
All reports will be generated in 5-10 minutes of upload.

 

 

Feature #1 – Complete details of the objects

 

  •  Supports text/font, shape, image objects
  •  Resolution dependent (Screen Pixel) units
  •  Resolution independent (Point) units (Auto conversion based on target pixel density of the device ) – example iOS Retina, Non-Retina, Android (LDPI, MDPI, HDPI, XHDPI, XXHDPI, XXXHDPI etc. ), PC Screen standard web resolution  etc.
  •  Font formatting information – size , family, style, color,

 

Feature #2 — Complete details of color, shapes, images & font

  • Supports text/font, shape, image objects
  • Font formatting information – size , family, style, color,
  •  Web safe / Non-web safe color analysis

 

SAMPLE STYLE GUIDE GENERATED FROM THE PROTOTYPE
https://samirshomepage.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/sample-generated-style-guide-output1418308769-en.pdf

 

LINK1:
https://www.behance.net/gallery/41228843/Specstra-2-Cloud-Based-Style-Guide-Automation

LINK2:
https://www.behance.net/gallery/26346085/Specstra-Extract-CSS-Assets-Info-from-PSD-Design-

Beta Testing in the Ever Changing World of Automation

(Apart from some details about my prototype in Beta Testing, this also explores the interesting definitions from ISO regarding quality that brings “reviews in context” that fundamentally lauds usability philosophies. (Originally first published at RedHat Blog in January 2018)

Beta testing is fundamentally all about the testing of a product performed by real users in a real environment. There are many tags we use to refer to the testing of similar characteristics, such as User Acceptance Testing (UAT), Customer Acceptance Testing (CAT), Customer Validation, and Field Testing (more popular in Europe). Whichever tag we use for these testing cases, the basic components are more or less the same. To discover and fix potential issues, this involves the user and front-end user interface (UI) testing, as well as the user experience (UX) related testing. This always happens in the iteration of the software development lifecycle (SDLC) where the idea has transformed into design and has passed the development phases, while the unit and integration testing has already been completed.

The beta stage in the product lifecycle management (PLM) is the ideal opportunity to hear from the target market and to plan for the road ahead.

As we zoom into this phase of testing it has a board spectrum of ranges. On one side is the Front-End or UI related testing involving UI functionality (Cosmetic, UI level Interaction and Visual look and feel). At the other end is the User Experience (UX), including user testing involving more from A/B (split) testing, hypothesis, user behavior tracking and analysis, heat maps, user flows and segment preference study or exploratory testing and feedback loops.

Beta testing relies on the popular belief that goodness will prevail, which defines the typical tools that carry out such tests. Examples are the shortening of beta cycles, reducing the time investment, increasing tester participation, improving the feedback loop and visibility, etc.

The Importance of Beta Testing

If we dive deeper into the factors behind the existence of tools from different angles, we find two major reasons that advocate the importance of beta testing:

1. Left-right brain analogy, which points to the overlap between humans and technology.

The typical belief is that the left-hand side of the brain mostly processes the logical thinking, while the right-hand side is more about the emotional thinking. Based on this popular analogy, when we map the different aspects involved in different stages of SDLC for a digital product across a straight line from left to right (refer to the diagram below), we will notice the logical and more human-centered aspects are divided by an imaginary line from the center. We will also notice the gradual progression of the emotional index for the components from left to right.

When we map these to the beta testing phase, we notice these right-hand components are predominant. As users of the products (like humans), we are more emotionally connected to such aspects of the product, which are validated or verified in a beta test. This makes beta testing one of the most important testing phases in any SDLC.

Another interesting point to note is that when we look from the traditional software approach to define “criticality”, the areas that are tested during user acceptance testing (UAT / Beta), mostly fall into Class 3 and 4 type of criticality. But because these touch the core human aspects, they become more important. This Youtube video (Boy Receives Enchroma Glasses From Father) helps to illustrate the importance of technology touching the human emotions. It was posted by a popular brand of glasses to demonstrate how they can correct colorblindness in real time for the end user.

Interestingly, this is an aspect of “accessibility”, which is typically covered during a beta test. Considering this video, the aspect of accessibility naturally raises the question about what we can do for this father and son as a tester, as a developer, or as a designer? And when we look at the stats, we find that the number of people the accessibility impacts is huge. One in every five people is challenged by some kind of disability. And unfortunately, some reports indicate that a majority of websites do not conform to the World Wide Web contortion’s (W3C) accessibility guidelines (in 2011 almost 98% of websites failed the W3C’s accessibility guideline).

This helps to demonstrate the human angle, which advocates why beta testing is important to ensure these aspects are validated and verified to ensure the target user needs are completely met.

2. A second reason for advocating the importance of beta testing is evaluating it from the international standards perspective (ISO/IEC 9126-4). This helps to define the difference between usability and quality.

The International Standards Organization (ISO) has been focused on the standards around quality versus usability over time. In 1998 ISO identified efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction as major attributes of usability. In 1999 a quality model was proposed, involving an approach to measure quality in terms of software quality and external factors. In 2001 the ISO/IEC 9126-4 standard suggested that the difference between usability and the quality in use is a matter of context of use. ISO/IEC 9126-4 also distinguished external quality versus internal quality and defined related metrics. Metrics for external quality can be obtained only by executing the software product in the system environment for which the product is intended.

This shows that without usability/human computer interaction (HCI) in the right context, the
quality process is incomplete. The context referred to here is fundamental to a beta test where you have real users in a real environment, thereby making the case of the beta test stronger.

Beta Testing Challenges

Now that we know why beta testing is so very critical, let’s explore the challenges that are involved with a beta stage.

Any time standards are included, including ISO/IEC 9126, most of these models are static and none of them accurately describe the relationship between phases in the product development cycle and appropriate usability measures at specific project milestones. Any standard also provides relatively few guidelines about how to interpret scores from specific usability metrics. And specific to usability as a quality factor, it is worth noting that usability is that aspect of quality where the metrics have to be interpreted.

When we look at popular beta-testing tools of today, the top beta testing tools leave the interpretation to the customer or to the end-user’s discretion. This highlights our number one challenge in beta testing, which is how to filter out pure perception from the actual and valid issues and concerns brought forward.

As most of the issues are related to user testing (split testing and front-end testing), there is no optimized single window solution that is smart enough to handle this in an effective manner. Real users in the real environment are handicapped to comprehend all the aspects of beta testing and properly react. It’s all a matter of perspective and all of them cannot be validated with real data from benchmarks or standards.

The World Quality Report in 2015-16 Edition indicated that expectations from Beta testing is changing dramatically. It hinted that the customers are looking for more product insights through a reliable way to test quality and functionality, along with the regular usability and user testing in real customer facing environment.

It’s not only the Beta Testing, but more user-demand is also impacted by the rising complexities and challenges due to accelerated changes in the technology, development, and delivery mechanisms. The 2017-18 World Quality Report states that the test environment and test data continue to be an achilles heel for QA and Testing.   The challenges with testing in agile development are also increasing. There is now a demand for automation, mobility, and ubiquity, along with smartness to be implemented in the software quality testing. Many believe that the analytics-based automation solutions would be the first step in transforming to smarter QA and smarter test automation. While this true for overall QA and testing, this is also true for Beta Testing, which deals with the functional aspect of the product.

Let’s see where we stand today. If we explore popular beta testing solutions, we will get a big vacuum in the area where we try to benchmark the user’s need for more functional aspects, along with the usability and user testing aspects. Also, you can notice in the diagram below that there is ample space to play around with the smart testing scenario with the use of cognitive, automation, and machine learning.

(Note: Above figure shows my subjective analysis of the competitive scenario.)

Basically, we lack “smartness” and proper “automation” in Beta Testing Solutions.

Apart from all these, there are some more challenges that we can notice if we start evaluating the user needs from the corresponding persona’s viewpoint. For example, even when assuming that the functional aspect is to be validated, the end-user or the customer may have an inability to recognize it. The product owner, customer, or end-user are part of the user segment who may not be aware of the nuts and bolts of the technology involved in the development of the product they are testing to sign it off. It’s like the classic example of a customer who is about to buy a second-hand car and inspects the vehicle before making the payment. In most of the cases, he is paying the money without being able to recognize “What’s inside the bonnet!”. This is the ultimate use-case that advocates to “empower the customer”.

So, how do we empower the end user or the customer? The tools should support that in a way so that the user can have his own peace of mind while validating the product. Unfortunately, many small tools which try to solve some of those little issues to empower the user are scattered (example: Google Chrome extension that helps to analyze CSS and creates the report or an on-screen ruler that the user can use to check alignment, etc.). The ground reality is that there is no single-window extension/widgets based solution available. Also, not all widgets are connected. And those which are available, not all are comprehensible to the customer/end-user as almost all of them are either developer or tester centric. They are not meant for the customer without any special skills!

When we look at the automation solutions in testing as part of much Continous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD), they are engaged and effective in mostly “pre-beta” stage of SDLC. Also, they require specific skills to run them. With the focus on DevOps, in many cases, the CI-CD solutions are getting developed and integrated with the new age solutions looking at the rising complexities of technology stacks, languages, frameworks, etc.. But most of them are for the skilled dev or test specialists to use and execute them. And this is something that does not translate well when it comes to Beta testing where the end-user or the customer or the “real user in real environment” are involved.

Assuming we can have all these automation features enabled in BETA, it still points to another limitation in the existing solutions. It’s because the employment of automation brings in its own challenge of “information explosion”, where the end user needs to deal with the higher volume of data from automation. With so much information, the user will struggle to get a consolidated and meaningful insight of the specific product context.   So what do we need to solve these challenges? Here is my view — we need smart, connected, single window beta testing solutions with automation that can be comprehensible to the end-users in a real environment without the help of the geeks.

For sometime since a last few years, I have been exploring these aspects for the ideal beta testing solution and was working on the model and a proof of concept called “Beta Studio”, representing the ideal beta testing solution, which should have all these —  Beta-Testing that utilizes data from all stages of SDLC and PLM along with the standards + specs and user testing data to provide more meaningful insights to the customer.  Test real applications in real environments by the real users. Customer as well as end-user centric. Test soft aspects of the application — Usability, Accessibility, Cosmetic, etc..  Be smart enough to compare and analyze these soft aspects of the application against functional testing data.

Use machine-learning & cognitive to make the more meaningful recommendation and not just dump info about bugs and potential issues. Here is an indicative vision of Beta Studio:

Mostly this vision of the ideal beta testing solution touches upon all the aspects we just discussed. It also touches upon all the interaction points of the different personas; e.g. customer, end-user, developer, tester, product owner, project manager, support engineer, etc.. It should cover the entire Product Life Cycle and utilize automation along with the machine learning components such as Computer Vision (CV) and Natural Language Processing (NLP). Then gathering this information to be processed by the cognitive aspect to generate the desired insights about the product and recommendations. During this process, the system will involve data from standards and specs along with the design benchmark generated from the inputs at the design phase of the SDLC, so that meaningful insights can be generated.

In order to see this vision translated into reality, what do we need? The following diagram hints about the six steps we need to take.

  1. First we should create the design benchmark from the information at the design stage that can be used in comparing the product features against metrics based on this design benchmark.
  2. Then automate and perform manual tracking of the product during runtime in real time and then categorize and collate this data.
  3. This involves creating features to support the user feedback cycle and user testing aspects (exploratory, split testing capabilities).
  4. Collect all standards and specifications on different aspects — e.g. Web Content Accessibility Guideline (WCAG) Section 508, Web Accessibility Initiative Specs ARIA, Design Principles, W3C Compliance, JS Standards, CSS Standards & Grids, Code Optimization Metrics Error codes & Specs, Device Specific Guidelines (e.g. Apple Human Interface Guideline) etc.
  5. Build the critical components such as Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing units which would process all the data collected in all these stages and generate the desired metrics and inferences.
  6. Build the unit to generate the model to map the data and compare against the metrics.
  7. The final step is to build the cognitive unit that can compare the data and apply the correct models and metrics to carry out the filtering of the data and generate the insights which can be shared as actionable output to the end-user/customer.

While experimenting for BetaStudio, I have explored different aspects and built some bare bone POCs. For example, Specstra is a component that can help create Design benchmark from design files.

With Specstra I was trying to address the issues related to the cosmetic aspect or visual look and feel. Typically when it comes to cosmetic issues, more than 30% are non-functional and mostly cosmetic. There is no reliable solution that helps in benchmarking these kind of issues against specific standards. One third of the issues found during the beta / UAT stages of testing are mostly cosmetic and alignment issues, including category 3 and 4 types. And these happen mostly because the two persona’s involved (developer and designer) have their own boundaries defined by a mythical fine line.

When a developer is in focus, roughly 45% of them are not aware of all the design principles employed or the heuristics of UX to be employed. Similarly, half of the designers are not aware of more than half of the evolving technological solutions about design.

And in 70% of the of the projects, we do not get detailed design specs to benchmark with. Detailing out a spec for design comes with a cost and required skills. In more than two-thirds of the cases of development there is the absence of detailed design with specs. Many of the designs are not standardized and most of them do not have clear and detailed specs. Design is carried out by different tools so it is not always easy to have a centralized place where all the designs info is available for benchmarking.

Specstra comes in handy to solve this. It is an Automation POC that is more like a cloud-based Visual Design Style Guide Generator from the third party design source files. This is a case where the user would like to continue using his existing Design tools like Photoshop/Sketch or Illustrator, PDF etc..

You can view the video of the demo here:

View the demo of the BetaStudio POC here:

I understand that reaching the goal of an ideal beta testing solution might require effort and will likely evolve over time. Rest assured, the journey has started for all of us to connect and explore how to make it a reality.

Originally published at the RedHat Blog at https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/01/05/beta-testing-automation/

 

 

 

 

An Experiment for Automating Design Specs

This post talks about one of my weekend experiments, back in 2013, to explore the possibilities of automation to create visual design specification documents. (Originally published in March 2017 at Design at IBM Blog and other sites. )

‘Automation’ is the buzz now in every nook and corner of the tech industry. When we try to resolve productivity issues involved in design domain that is now powering Design driven Software Development Life Cycles (SDLC), we always end-up with a little innovation and that’s what the story of ‘Specstra’, is all about.

Automation is one of the trending phenomenon of the current technological world. Manufacturing industry has been pioneering it for decades. Other verticals are following it. In software development, testing and deployment field, automation is popularized by Dev OPS and Continuous Integration (CI) which help speed-up the software development life cycle (SDLC). But the SDLC includes the design process components along with the technology driven ones.

In today’s world, while design is getting more and more recognition across the entrepreneur world and many industry efforts like ‘IBM Design Thinking’ and similar frameworks, trying to create a synergy between the ‘Agile’ approach of SDLC and the “Design Thinking”. It is an interesting crossroad in time where the next big thing in automation is to, bring it to the creative process. In cthe ontext of Software industry ,I always see “Design” as an intersection between creativity and the technology where both shape each with the help from user-needs and blending of these results into successful products. This also is the reason automating designing process is a lot more challenging than building solutions for automation of purely technology driven process.

Few years back, at an R&D center of a leading mobile brand in Bangalore, I was part of a creative team, where almost 70% of the crowd were visual designers. Many of the creative crowd, complained about the design process that involved creation of style guide of the apps that they were working on. Every app-project used to be developed for different flagship phones models with different resolutions as well as screen densities. And being developed in native languages for Android view-ports, designer used to develop each style guide for each project separately for each model of phone. Each style-guide has to be detailed to pixel level which the designer has to calculate and define taking calculation of the view port Pixel Density (PD). Many designers have to maintain different versions of the mock-up and the create specs for each version, which was more like a “drafts man’s job” with lesser creative moments for expressions and innovation than the previous phase where the designer has to follow the wire-frame and come up with pixel perfect mock-ups of the app screens.

Almost all the designers tried to grab their hands on the creative part of the job, getting engaged with the stake-holders and the designers preferred to avoid working on the style-guide, though they would love to review one. The ‘not-so-seniors’ worked on the drafting of the guide and churned out the specs document, yet do the crying that it is less creative even though it is one of the most critical part of the design process. On calculating how much effort we are giving to a creative phase of creating a visual mock-up vs. a drafting work, it turned out that roughly on average, one view of a single screen to be mocked up in something around 4–8 hours. Creation of a very detailed spec. might need 4–6 hours of job. But if it is designed for multiple view-ports of an operating system with significant pixel density change along with varied resolutions, then this drafting time gets multiplied. So by creating 4 generations of phone models running different generation of Android might need 16–24 hours. So the designer actually takes roughly one week of work for a view in this case from wire-framing stage to finished design with specs ready for the developer. Averagely an app can have 10 views, so the whole app would need approximately a month of work to be designed and be ready for 4 different models. Even though this is a very high level bare-bone calculation, it indicated a few things –for the designer 1/4th of his work remains creative whereas the remaining 3/4th of his time is a purely drafts-man job, leading to an unsatisfying job experience.

Similarly for the organization, they are is paying higher fee for lower type of work, as the typical higher salary of the designer is spent in that 3/4th of the lower type less creative work. Moreover, even though the 3/4th of the job is lower profile job, which could have been automated, consumes more from the delivery time. if we look at the timeline of the delivery of the design deliverables, we see that 1/4th of the delivery time is actually spent in creative way. So actually if there is a scope to automate the low profile manual work, where the designer does not need to use his right brain, then the deliverables could have been delivered in just 1 week instead of a month! Also note that time is money for industry, so the organization is actually spend 300% more than it should and that too on a higher price point. Again, apart from this there are other factor that contributed to above problem. Being in a world of rapidly changing requirements, many industry are following “Agile” or “Iterative” approach of work. Which means in the short notice things can change even to the look and feel and UI aspect which would mean a change to the style guide if view of standard control lines are affected. This has a cascading effect that flows through the style guide work. So any change in such requirement means the wastage of effort and addition of new efforts to keep the specs aligned.

(Fig — ‘Specstra’ address many of the typical automation pain-points when it comes to generate visual design style guide)

Again, apart from this there are other factor that contributed to above problem. Being in a world of rapidly changing requirements, many industry are following “Agile” or “Iterative” approach of work. Which means in the short notice things can change even to the look and feel and UI aspect which would mean a change to the style guide if view of standard control lines are affected. This has a cascading effect that flows through the style guide work. So any change in such requirement means the wastage of effort and addition of new efforts to keep the specs aligned.

Specstra is a pet prototype that I had started working on, 3 years back (around 2013) to explore a possible solution for design related automation process. The user can upload Adobe Photoshop ( PSD), Adobe Illustrator (.AI), or PDF formatted exported from any design tool (Corel draw, Paint etc.) and within minutes Specstra can generate style guide which other wise would have taken the user days to complete and that with prone to error.

(Fig — The printable visual style guide generated within minutes from ‘Specstra’ comes handy for developers to make a pixel perfect UI)

Based on these findings, in 2013, I had started working on a pet experiment Specstra, to explore a possible solution for design related automation process specially creation of the visual style guides out of different design file formats. Basically, my focus was to automate the blocks that were more aligned to less creative activity so that these blocks can be removed from the creative process flow. As of today, Specstra become one of the proof of concept software of its kind where the user can upload Adobe Photoshop (.PSD), Adobe Illustrator (.AI), or PDF formatted exported from any design tool (Corel draw, Paint, InDesign etc.) and within minutes it can generate style guide which otherwise would have taken the user days to complete and that with chances of having human error.

(Fig — It takes a minute for ‘Specstra’ to generate a print-ready 100 pages long style guide for any submitted design)

Basically, it proved that the typical designer pain-points like tedious manual process, higher consumption of effort, time and cost of coming out with style guides can be removed with automation. Bigger than that, this experiment proved that automation is possible in design creative process!

[ Originally published on March 4, 2017, at Design at IBM ]