The 3 Dimensions of DesOps

In recent times many have attempted to define the DesOps in easier words to the community. But many of those attempts never went beyond the explorations beyond the efforts put to define a Design System. In many cases in many UX communities and teams, the definitions of DesOps is limited within the scope of Design System, which in turn essentially is a meta-product i.e. a product that enables other products. Then what is the scope of DesOps?

In my view, DesOps is not only about tools or technology employed which is generally referred to the discourses about binging automation and improved process re-engineering in the engineering sense. Rather DesOps is about defining a culture of design through improved work practices and communication among the design teams with the inter-cum-intra project/product teams and stakeholders and aiding these practices with the help of technology to bring communications among the involved tools and the arching eco-systems.

So DesOps is rather a combination of —

Designing of Design Culture and Communications + Work practices EcoSystem of Tools & Technologies 

In the Designing of Design Culture basically the design process is involved to come up with a solution that takes into account the existing gaps and areas of improvement which is needed for a specific organisation where communities or a teams involved in product life cycles, (in case of Software industry, it’s more influenced from the Software Development Life Cycle ) to improve productivity, remove wastage (in terms of effort, delivery timeline, man-power etc. ) and in many cases establish a lean process and methodologies. As DesOpsis associated with these aspects, and especially the Lean Process and methodologies, it intern impacts the culture and how the team collaborate, work and communicate.

DesOps, in other words, empowers the philosophies of the Lean UX and Fail-Fast models of start-up organisations in a better way. So the process that involves the work-culture, team – communication, product feedback loops etc. are re-designed as a part of DesOpsimplementation and this is referred as Work practices.

To aid the above two, in DesOps implementation, the focus is more on automation involving certain workflow engineering to support the re-design process (referred in the paragraph above). Basically, this 3rd aspect is more about the translation of the about two aspects with the help of technologies and building and putting in places the tools to define the required eco-system that brings seamless delivery track and complement it with DevOps through continuous and integrated delivery approach with the arching feedback loop. The use of automation in this aspect improves efficiency and scales the whole process across the whole product delivery cycle and reduces wastage.

So here is a crude way to group the different dimensions of DesOps, which come into play while modelling DesOps solution for a target organisation or team. Let’s not take them literally as many of these dimensions have overlaps among them, for example, the way we work might involve components from the cultural shift dimension.

1. Culture – The social behavior and norms that It is internally affected by both forces encouraging change and forces resisting change — which are related to structures and events within the DesOps system of humans as well as machines, and are involved in the perpetuation of cultural ideas and practices within current structures, which themselves are subject to change.

i. Principles & Practices

ii. Cultural Shift towards Lean Philosophies

iii. The way the team works (Mostly Design team but not excluding the intra-team work-culture)

2. Process – Process, primarily, a sequence of interdependent and linked procedures, is an important aspect that is made up of the workflows and the over-arching feedback-loop that acts as the spine of DesOps. Being organically associated with different functions, it involves the actions on different spheres of the operations running within the organization as well as the systems involved.

i. Work-flows

ii. Feedback- loop

3. Eco-System – Eco-System being is a regularly interacting or interdependent group of entities forming an integrated whole, deals with the technology, tools and the design systems powered with automation, that makes DesOps real on the ground. Eco-system provide the required support to the culture as well as the processes to function as well as transform.

i. Technologies

ii. Tools

iii. Design Systems

iv. Automation architectures and approaches

Stay tuned and be part of the DesOps journey with me.

 

 

(c) 2018, Samir Dash. All rights reserved.

DesOps : the Next Wave in Design

DesignOps or DesOps is an approach to design, inspired by the culture of DevOps. In this article series, we will be touching upon the practical approaches on how to prepare for this next-wave in design that compliments DevOps in the concepts of a cultural shift, collaboration and automation. We will also see what are the available solutions today that contribute to bringing the full circle of design in the context of software development lifecycle.

In today’s world, while design as a discipline is getting more and more recognition across the entrepreneur world and many industry efforts like IBM Design Thinking and similar frameworks, trying to create a synergy between the Agile approach of SDLC and the Design Thinking. It is an interesting crossroad in time where the next big thing in product delivery is to bring scalability as well as automation to the creative process. In the context of the Software industry, I always see “Design” as an intersection between creativity and the technology where both shape each with the help from user-needs and blending of these results into successful products. Any typical software product delivered involves many complex as well as diverting technologies, processes, people and visions. Though mostly a software delivery happens with the team members decided in two major groups – developers and designers, ultimately the best outcome always depends on the fact that how these two teams communicate with each other and how efficiently the thoughts and ideas are shared, propagated and translated.

When it comes to product development, the amount of complexity and the variety of aspects starting from the diversified thinkings, technology, tools and processes that go into it, is significant. Attempts have been made over the period to improve various aspects of it ensure the delivery process can be optimised to scale upto the ever-expanding needs. In software and IT infrastructure industry, recently one such phenomenon was DevOps that focused on rethinking the development and operations to improve productivity and efficiency. DevOps started in the industry towards the last part of the first-decade post-millennium. Back in 2008, there was a fine separation between the roles who code and the roles who deploy them. Basically, the coders or the programmers were responsible with code generation while the infrastructure guys were looking after the process of deploying them.

Due to the rise of Agile process, this code generation and deployment as a part of delivery became more frequent and continuous unlike the age-old waterfall model, when it used to happen every 6 months or a year. In all major software services industry, it was common to have fixed calendar dates in the year that represented the release or deployments. The 2-3 weeks sprints of Agile approach made it obsolete in many. As the continuous delivery became the defacto standard, this narrowed down the gap between the development team and infrastructure team. This also gave rise to the need of multidisciplinary roles or individuals who can bridge the gap between the production environment and the development server, allowing their code to be deployed in a more efficient way and faster. As the DevOps took shape, the practices around it grew from a few talented hackers to a profession with a culture of its own involving its own set of tools, practices, technologies and workflows which became the norm in the industry today.

Most of the DevOps today focuses on the process blocks mostly impacted Engineering or technical aspects of the product rather than the design aspect. To bridge that gap, in recent times many attempts are being made to define a consistent approach called DesOps. The DesOps or DesignOps is a relatively new term. Many, to comprehend better, refer to DevOps, which has the prominent similar underlying philosophies and goals. Design operations (aka DesignOps ) is though relatively new concept yet is a growing area of concern for design teams seeking to help their teams increase the value they produce for their host organizations and that organization’s customers. The term and the practices exist inconsistently in many attempts made by different organisations since many years.

Even when we try to implement a DevOps geared process to run a Design driven process model, still the actual challenges, the gaps between the design and development or the design and testing blocks are not fixed. So without implementing a DesOps or DesignOpsto fix the design and other endpoint blocks in the process, the implementation of DevOps will never yield the desired outcome and will not be able to sustain the core philosophies behind it.

DesOps and DevOps both are complementary to each other. The Design delivery process improvements try to optimise the overall delivery process and thereby contributing to the DevOps. For example the aspects such as testing of the product that involves design aspects, usability, accessibility etc. In the testing phase needs some benchmark to referee to that can only come from a process where the DesOps has implemented that outputs and feeds the benchmark to the DevOps phase where the testing block can use it. In addition to this when we are in Agile or iterative and continuous process models, at each sprint cycle the end to end flow is executed and thereby making the Continous Integration(CI) and Continous Delivery (CD) truly meaningful.

DesOps, was primarily born out of the primary need of how to design at scale. The factors that shaped it are of similar nature that shaped DevOps. With the new age software delivery in recent times, with the Agile process and Continuous Integration and Deployment of code, the DevOps approach provided a faster highway to ensure faster delivery with low risks. So the earlier SDLC model got redefined over the period with Agile and Then the DevOps to its current shape.

However, as the design was an integral part of any product delivered, the necessity to ensure the gaps between traditional design life cycle working along with the fast track of development life cycle using DevOps are bridged. The need for tighter integration between the design team and the engineering team became a necessity to ensure to design at scale. During recent two-three years, the top five big companies heavy investments into this area pave the way for other organisations and design communities to be more explorative in this area. The implications of DesOps is reflected in the outcome, where the silos among the teams and disciplines get reduced. Along with this, it improves the collaboration among cross-functional team and working practices, that contributes to minimising wastage in the delivery process.

Keep tuned in… next, we will start explorations with the basic blocks for DesOps – i.e. the Design Systems.

 

(c) 2018, Samir Dash. All rights reserved.

[This was originally first published onMarch 26, 2018 on Linkedin at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/desops-next-wave-design-part-1-samir-dash/]